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and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
code word for climate science for it stop funding climate science. romney himself says there is no scientific consensus so we should support more debate and investigation within the scientific community, except no action but to make problems worse. what about democrats? they conceded there is a problem and advocate that we work toward a problem -- program to set limits with other emerging powers. but that's it. no action. in fact, obama has emphasized, we have to work hard to gain when because 100 years of energy independence by exploiting domestic or canadian resources by fracking and other elaborate technologies. it does not ask what the world would look like in 100 years. so there are differences. the differences are, basically, about how enthusiastically the lemmings' should march toward the cliff. [laughter] the second major issue, nuclear war. it is also on the front pages daily. but in a way that was seem outlandish to some independent and fervoobserver. it does seem outrageous to many around the world. the current threat, not for the first time, is in the middle
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
science and- "religion finds science," or something along those lines on the front page of the major news mags, and you get a sense of that in the medical world, too, that there's another dimension opening up. we were talking about that before the class, that there's something going on because we're nearing the millennium- you know, we don't want to date the class, but there certainly seems to be a lot of interest in religion, and it's popping up in a number of areas. anything else before we trudge into- happily, i should say- into- yeah. >> well, i was going to bring up a dramatic incident that happened to my daughter and myself. we were driving home from peoria, had a nice dinner by my son, and three cars ahead of us, two pickup trucks crashed, and the dynamic portion of the whole thing- because we called 911 and that- was how everyone worked together- cars parked on the side, men lifted the truck off of people. we were able to get the people out- the two boys were okay; the wife was really in bad shape. but i mean, to be part of that, i mean, it is like you just prayed a lot and said,
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: so for several months now, christine pelosi and i have been trying to get duf sundheim to throw his support behind the president. tonight is our final penitentiary. welcome back to you both. duf are you ready to say uncle? >> you know what, i didn't find the fact that you called the fact that your father your favorite republican, but when you put christie ahead of me it hurt my feelings. >> jennifer: all right. epic fail on my part. >> here you can have the halloween candy. okay. chris christie had a beautiful moment today. not only did barack obama look very presidential but chris christie took a tentative step towards 2016. >> jennifer: yeah, let's just say that duf could have a beautiful moment right here. >> i think that was back in april 15th that you were right. >> jennifer: let me do something here, duf. vice president biden had a very interesting line about mitt romney today. take a listen in florida. >> his plans are sketchy, they are etch-a-sketchy. that's wh
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo id. the democrats are worried about pennsylvania. in 2010, we won the u.s. senate seat a
in washington, d.c.. he received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from the universities of cairo, and masters of international law from the university of paris, and this is quite fitting because in the arab world with one out of three of all arabs being egyptians, egyptians have participated in and leading representatives in international organizations in more than any other country in the arab world, and, indeed, one egyptian became the secretary general of the united nations. please join me in welcoming mohamed taufik. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. i'd like to start by thanking dr. anthony for your kind introduction and kind invitation for me to be here today. particularly, i'd li to thank you fo the fantastork you an the council have be doing to promote relations between the ited states and the ash world. these relations are vital f the interest of both paies, and i look forward to continue to cooperation and continued efforts to promote these relations. i feel i have a special role being the first ambassador of egypt after the revolution to the united states. it's a
it said redaction is then made. and we often found that this was not a science. someone said this morning, it was a mathematical. it is hard. and you will have people disagree even within the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. we would get very significant reductions. give it to another person, much less significant, and it would argue with each other as to what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply with a broad stroke redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why it would harm the national security which is the standard. by pushing back the information in the public that it turned out to be was not able to be released and give the public and insight on what was happening within the agency. inside having access and permission we have the ability and roll that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government because you know what is happening within the agency. you know where the bodies are buried. you know how th
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. so i brought it to mike at meineke. we gave her car a free road handling check. i like free. free is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening now, outage boils over with thousands of runners about to converge on new york's devastated staten island to kickoff the city's legendary marathon. plus, cnn's with national guard troops as they search homes in one storm-ravaged area not accessible until now. and will sandy throw a rench in the presidential election now just four days away? ahead, the challenges voters could face in states hardest hit by the storm. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the numbers continue to go up. 97 people here in the united states now confirmed dead in superstorm sandy's wake. at least 165 internationally. and on new york's staten island, which is bearing the brunt of the storm's wrath, the outrage is only inte
in electric auto and solar company we'll invest in energy science and research. to make discoveries that can actually change our energy world. and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we will make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and products and services and we'll findly -- finally hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. look, i'm going to stand up for the rights and interests of american workers and employers and we're going to grow jobs by making america the best place for job creatorsing for entrepreneurs, for small business. this will mean upkating and reshaping regulations to encourage growth by lowering tax rates while lowering deductions and bay making it clear from day one that unlike the current administration we like business. and the jobs that business creates. and timely, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need to succeed. training programs are going to be shaped by the states where people live and schools will put the interests of our
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)